Netflix Says We Should Talk About Sex, Baby

With 40 million views in its first month, it’s no wonder that Netflix announced that “Sex Education” will have a second season.

“It’s one of the funniest things I’ve seen in a long time,” California Lutheran University sophomore Garon Plattor said. “I recommended it all to my friends.”

From the name, I assumed it was going to be a documentary or something uninteresting. Instead, it’s a teenage comedy-drama about sex that’s non-cringeworthy for its viewers and accessible to those who may need it.

The main character Otis Milburn is an inexperienced 17-year-old when it comes to relationships and sex. He starts an unofficial sex clinic at school with classmate Maeve Wiley to help students with sex and intimacy issues. The inspiration came from his mum, a professional sex therapist, and an incident with the headmaster’s son, Adam Groff.

The show explores many different relevant storylines to today’s society in its eight episodes. It’s refreshing to see topics from drag to abortion to the dangers of sharing nude photos in the show, while being witty and light-hearted at the same time.

“They’re not trying to sugarcoat anything. I like how real it is and all the issues they deal with; it’s very diverse in that way,” senior Kristin Wannemo said.

With its diverse characters, “Sex Education” has added an important representation of the LGBTQ community.

“I think seeing a show like that can help people understand it a little bit better and maybe relate to it, but at least see the struggles people go through. There’s a lot of misunderstanding out there especially in the LGBT community,” Plattor said.

Plattor added that homosexuality can be hard to understand if you’ve never been through it, around it or discussed it. This is something that this show allows: knowledge and discussion. He said he appreciated how open and honest the characters were about the topic of sex.

“I think it’s a good idea for people to be watching it … [and] talk about topics that they might not be comfortable with. I think they also should be educated on safe sex so you don’t end up pregnant or with STDs because these things happen,” Cal Lutheran senior Giacomo Sumner said.

Wannemo shares a similar point of view. Born and raised in Sweden, she noticed that people in America seem to be more conservative when talking about sex and other “taboo” topics.

She said in Sweden “it was pretty liberal, you can go talk to parents about stuff like that, and parents would talk to you.” But not everyone has the luxury of having someone to talk to about sex even though it’s a normal part of life. Often young people grow up never discussing it.

The show follows three main characters. Otis Milburn is a boy struggling with his own sexuality and the pressures that society puts on masculinity. His classmate and eventual business partner Maeve Wiley is a girl who puts off a tough, mean exterior but on the inside she is struggling like everyone else. Eric Effoing is Otis’s gay best friend who is exploring his sexuality and love for drag.

“Toxic masculinity exists in today’s society, where men are supposed to be born sexual creatures… I think that’s really important for other boys his age to see that it’s okay [to not be sexual],” Wannemo said.

“Sex Education” is a show that is great for older teenagers and those in college having new experiences. Young people might not fully understand the issues and may find it inappropriate at points.

Wannemo said the show does  a good job of addressing the common issues and dilemmas high school and college students must deal with.

“You’re really struggling to figure out who you are. You don’t have that much self-confidence and everything that happens around you is pretty new to you with sex and girls and boys,” Wannemo said.

If you’re not one of the 40 million viewers that have seen this show, then I highly suggest that you watch it to be ready for season two.

Rosie Baker
Reporter