Women are outperforming men academically

Ladies, it seems that you are finally getting what you asked for and have worked so many years to achieve: A higher standing in society than men.

There is now evidence proving that women are getting there, anyway. Hanna Roisin, author of the book “The End of Men,” has made news recently with new statistics that show that women are quickly outperforming men in many areas of society.

These areas include a higher rate of post-high school enrollment, with men representing approximately 40 percent (9 million) of the college population and women 60 percent (12 million). The projection is that by 2019, there will be an increase of over two million women and only 500,000 men.

In addition to the higher number of women in colleges and universities, women are said to be outperforming men academically as well.

“Girls tend to be more oriented based on organization. Just knowing when things are due, making sure they are done. That ends up playing a big role,” said senior Kiera Murphy. Murphy also said that feeling responsible for her schoolwork and getting things done in a timely manner is important to her overall sense of organization.

While I agree with Murphy, Roisin has another theory, that the increasing rates of unemployed men and single mothers have created a breeding ground for the realization that women need to support themselves.

I’m not sure that I agree with this. I think that men, especially in college, are just more distracted. Men have different learning styles and are more focused on the now, rather than the future.

Student Andrea Fikse believes learning styles and backgroud play a role.

“Learning styles definitely, but I think that it has more to do with your background than your gender,” said Fikse.

Additionally, she thinks that it is the responsibility of the educational systems to have higher expectations for their students.

This makes perfect sense. Students from homes that encourage learning and expect greatness in and out of the classroom seem to do better and work harder.

A perfect example is the TV series “Gossip Girl.” Those Upper East Side kids are expected to go to an Ivy League school and therefore they do whatever is necessary to balance school, social life and TV drama.

Yes, “Gossip Girl” is just a TV drama, but it resonates with me as I sit writing this frantically to get the grade I need. I come from a very supportive background, but I have always expected myself to do well. Regardless of how I get there or how late I have to stay up, I will get it all done while managing a social life.

“The whole stereotype of multi-tasking comes in,” Murphy said. “Being able to balance a personal life with an education.”

Of course there are the obvious exceptions. Fiske has a male student in her geology class who repeatedly trumps the grades of others in the class, but she believes that he is an exception to the rule.

But let’s be real. How many science majors have time to balance life outside of school, much less extra curricular activities?

Senior Stanford Anthony thinks that there are more distractions for guys than girls in college.

“There’s like video games and going out and working out,” he said. “Maybe girls might not focus on those things as guys might. There’s not as many distractions for girls as guys.”

Murphy agrees with this.

“My guy friends are more concerned with what they are going to have for dinner,” she said. “As opposed to what I’m going to do in five years.”

In my classes, I definitely feel there are more women that tend to regularly speak up, have opinions and ask questions. Men don’t, feeling like that it is less manly to ask, question and clarify.

“I do sometimes see that girls do better in some aspects of school,” said Stanford.

For more information or to read Roisin’s book, check out  “The End of Men” on Amazon.com.

 

Miles George
Staff Writer
Published Oct. 31, 2012