Students should make healthier choices

College students tend to get so caught up in classes, homework and parties, that they completely forget about staying healthy. Being healthy should be a priority.

Students often do not prioritize productively. I am sure no college student looks forward to gaining the “freshman 15.”

In order to avoid this weight gain, a good foundation of basic health necessities is crucial. People should not rely on diets to lose weight.

CLU fitness Boot Camp instructor and former marine Mark Glesne said, “As a rule of thumb, I don’t recommend anything that begins with the word ‘die’. So instead of a diet, I prefer and recommend a nutrition plan. The former simply tells you what you can’t eat, while the latter teaches you what you should eat.”

According to Jenna Cee in a 2011 article on livestrong.com, it is very important to keep your metabolism going. That means eating every two to three hours.

The longer you wait to eat between meals, the slower your metabolism becomes.

When the body is hungry it will attack muscle first. You want to give your body the proper “fuel” it needs in order for it to perform at its maximum potential.

With so many unhealthy food options, college students are not using their power to choose what they eat.

Students should think more carefully next time they grab an ice cream from the Centrum. When deciding what to eat, consider the benefits or harm your choices will have on your body.

Be sure to know if the food you’re eating contains protein, fat, sugar, or carbs and if it contains high levels of sodium. If you care about your body, you will think before eating. The level of respect students have for their bodies is too low.

“I just get whatever I’m in the mood for, whether it be hot chocolate, a sandwich, pizza, or fries,” said freshman Samantha Steele.

Exercise is a crucial part of a healthy lifestyle. Not only does it contribute to a nice physique, exercise also is a great way to relieve stress or anger.

It can help take your mind off worries that college students are often troubled with.

I think all students should make it a priority to work out regularly for at least an hour a day, four to five days a week.

Arnold Schwarzenegger said that working out for an hour is only four percent of your day. No excuses.

Many students complain that there is not enough time to exercise, or that they are overloaded with homework. If they treated working out like they do a class or a practice, they’d have enough time to fit everything into their schedule.

If you have enough time to surf the web or watch your favorite TV show, you have enough time to work out.

The gym is open from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on the weekends.

Students also don’t realize the affect alcohol consumption can have on their weight.

When asked about the effects of alcohol on muscle growth, sophomore Holly Dunn said, “I honestly don’t know. I feel as though it would have an effect over a period of time.”

Drinking can have a negative effect short term as well as long term.

“It [alcohol consumption] is actually one of the biggest degenerates there is for that type of tissue and functionality. It will not only prevent you from achieving your maximum muscle growth potential and strength, but it will also drastically weaken your involuntary muscles and those associated with the urinary and bowl system,” said LA Fitness athletic director and head trainer Paul Gale.

Students who drink and believe it will not affect their physical abilities are in denial of the truth.

Students should consider the harmful effects alcohol can have the next time they go to a party, especially if they have fitness goals they are trying to achieve.

If students go beyond dieting and are more aware of what they eat, they will eventually see the results from living a healthy lifestyle.

 

Alexis Schomer
Staff Writer
Published Nov. 14, 2012