Computer science majors can find a career in the cloud

Things are looking up for computer science majors at CLU.

Already placing consistently in the top 10 most valuable majors according to Forbes magazine, new job opportunities for computer science majors are opening up right here in Southern California.

At the California Lutheran University Corporate Leaders Breakfast on Tuesday, Nov. 6, entrepreneur and investor Woody Rollins spoke about the growing industry of cloud computing and the increasing opportunities for computer science majors at companies such as his own, Eucalyptus Systems and AppFolio.

“It is the future,” said Siddhanth Samtani, a computer science major. “There’s so much scope in cloud computing right now. It is going to be the future of the whole computing generation.”

Cloud computing involves the use of computer resources delivered over the Internet or other networks. Cloud computing programs such as Google Drive, Dropbox and iCloud, allow users to store files in the cloud.

Dr. Chang-Shyh Peng, computer science department chair, sees the massive potential of cloud computing and computer science in general.

He pointed to estimates that show there will be a shortage of computer science majors in the near future numbering from 40 to 50 thousand in the smart phone and tablet app market alone.

He also cited studies by US News and CNN Money, which consistently placed jobs requiring a computer science degree in the top ten best jobs in the US.
However, he urges students not to be complacent.

“Even though the market and outlook looks very promising, we are not in the position to guarantee jobs,” said Peng. “Computer science is such a fast-changing field.”
Although it is fast-changing, computer science is also a broad field of study.

Marilyn Arceo, a computer science major, is more focused on the science aspect of her major.

She is currently studying swarm intelligence and said computer science can prepare students for a wide range of jobs when they graduate.

“I don’t think they should be worried because they are given a set of skills and I think they are capable of adapting to what they want to do and to a specific job,” said Arceo. “I feel like computer science majors are in high demand.”

Arceo plans on continuing her schooling for another five years, then getting a job in research at a university.

“If you’re passionate about what you do, you keep going further,” said Arceo.

Although Samtani does not plan to go into cloud computing when he graduates, he sees the immense potential in it and the growth for the computer science field in general.
“In the future I think it will be limitless,” said Samtani.

 

Joe Wood
Staff Writer
Published Nov. 28, 2012