Time Warner Cable deprives Lakers fans

I was sitting at McDonalds enjoying my 10-piece chicken nuggets combo meal when I had a realization. I love Monopoly. It’s a cute little game you play to win prizes at McDonalds.

I’m even all right with Monopoly as it’s own little cute board game.

However, I lose all patience for Monopoly when it becomes a part of sports.

That’s exactly what Time Warner Cable has done this past month.

It was a decision I think we all took for granted, but Time Warner Cable named the price and has effectively locked out most Los Angeles Laker fans with other cable providers.

Time Warner Cable reached an agreement with the Los Angeles Lakers on a 20-year deal, which is worth an estimated $3 billion, according to the Los Angeles Times.
It’s a deal that has left Lakers fans scratching their heads.

“I can’t watch the Lakers whenever I want because I have Verizon,” said CLU junior Jason Ricci. “I feel like I’m deprived of my Lakers. What would make this right is if they would air the Lakers on anything other than Time Warner.”

The frustration for Lakers fans is worsened by the fact that this was supposed to be the year that all the greatness was supposed to come together.

After an early departure in the second round of the postseason, the Lakers went shopping to upgrade their roster. Bringing in Steve Nash and Dwight Howard has been, and will continue to be, a roster upgrade.

“That is annoying in the fact that this is a year of greats,” said senior Jonathan Omokawa. “In the sense that it’s not accessible and there are so many high expectations for this Lakers team.”

It’s not even a decision that makes local restaurants happy.  One area bar decided to add Time Warner Cable just so they could make sure they’d be able to carry the Lakers once basketball season begins.

“Most restaurants and bars will only carry DirecTV and none of the other distributors because DirecTV has the NFL Network,” said Raj Gujral, owner of Draughts Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks.

“We’re not happy about it, and I don’t think most restaurants are.”

Lakers fans aren’t the only group that has been affected by this agreement.

The Time Warner Sports Network is now also the exclusive provider for all things Los Angeles Galaxy related to.

It’s hardly a big blow because the Galaxy aren’t exactly the local cash cow, but to know that I couldn’t watch them if I wanted to is a bit concerning.

But the fact that the Time Warner Sports Net has taken the Galaxy brings up another point to me.

Luckily for fans of the other area NBA team, the Clippers remain under contract until 2016 with Fox Sports Prime Ticket.

On the other hand, the Los Angeles Dodgers will see their contract expire with Fox Sports and KCAL in 2013.

What frightens me is the possibility that Time Warner Sports Net will be on the prowl again and try and leave Dodger fans high and dry.

Forbes.com predicts that the Dodgers deal could be somewhere in the ballpark 20-years and worth roughly $8.5 billion.

I don’t know who is going to ante up those kinds of bucks, but my fingers are crossed that it’s not Time Warner Sports Net.

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim fans can breathe a sigh of relief. At least for the next 19 seasons that is.

The Angels began the first of a 20-year deal with Fox Sports Net, which was worth $3 billion when it was signed.

That contract deal is what was responsible for bringing slugger Albert Pujols and pitching gem C.J. Wilson to the Angels.

For those of you who wonder, that combined $331.5 million-worth of contracts was only able to be picked up because of the newest television deals.

For those Lakers fans feebly waiting for Time Warner Sports Net to be made available, don’t hold your breath.

In the meantime, check iwantmylakers.com and see if maybe it is offered for you.

I doubt it will happen for a while, but it wouldn’t hurt to check.

The numbers that I use in this article are utterly insane.

It shouldn’t be a secret anymore that sports is one of the biggest cash cows out there.

But for all the money that changes hands, it is ridiculous that everyone who chooses to can’t sit down and turn on their television, no matter who their provider is, and watch their favorite team. This is exactly the monopoly I’m not ok with.

 

David Lopez
Staff Writer
Published Oct. 24, 2012